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  VOID 
 
 2004-
 

A universal form in the collective unconscious.
The shape of the Void goes back to the very first creations of humanity, to the clay ball found in ancient cultures. Sometimes, in the absence of an immediate link between our hands and our thoughts, our fingers have a tendency to act freely, to seize a malleable material (wax, bread crumbs, clay, paper etc...) in order to knead it with the thumbs and the index fingers and to make it roll on itself with the flat of the hand in a rotating movement.
The ball thus formed, evolves most often to occupy the volume of empty space between four fingers. The fingers naturally become the mold and a universal form in the collective unconscious.
The shape of the Void goes back to the very first creations of humanity, to the ball of clay found in ancient cultures. Sometimes, in the absence of an immediate link between our hands and our thoughts, our fingers have a tendency to act freely, to seize a malleable material (wax, bread crumbs, clay, paper etc...) in order to knead it with the thumbs and the index fingers and to make it roll on itself with the flat of the hand in a rotating movement.
The ball thus formed, evolves most often to occupy the volume of empty space between four fingers. The fingers naturally become the mold and the energy is then materialized in a recurring and liberating form. The sphere mutates into a smooth and curved tetrahedron, almost identical in all hands.
In an equally unconscious way, a new movement of the fingers generally transforms this tetrahedron into a mathematical figure as "primary" as the sphere: a cube. This primal gesture combines the opposites: the unconscious and mathematics and independent of individuality, it refers to interiority. It is the transitory and complex form of the tetrahedron, hidden by the fingers that we seek to make emerge, "to bring to the surface".

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Different steps for the formation of a Void
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Brancusi 1928
One can imagine sculptors such as Brancusi or Rodin having passed their lives in their studios in contact with clay to have also made voids, automatically, while reflecting.

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Void ceramics

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Void workshop, Beijin, 2010

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Void workshop, Beijin, 2010

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Void Haus Berlin, 6 Months residency @ Haus 1 Berlin, 2011

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Void workshop, Void Haus Berlin, 2011

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Void Certificats
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Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 22.37.27

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Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 22.36.17

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65 copy copy
65 copy copy

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Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 22.37.27
Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 22.37.27

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Void Pastries by MaPatissière, Void Haus Berlin, 2011 

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flg
flg

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Void Banner 

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Void sculpture in the Public Space. (Project), Beijin 2010

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Void stainless steel sculpture on the great wall of China. 

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Void Tent, Bar 25, Berlin 2009 

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Void Bean Bags 

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Void Balloons installation, GDK galerie Berlin. 2008 

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Void amulets